Vocabulary Activities

Enjoy the reports English 2, 5-10 students wrote about their work with vocabulary development in their classrooms. Writing a blog entry was a course requirement in Module 1 of the course.

Christopher | Irene | Guro | Liv Irene | Vigdis | Hjørdis | Tonje

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Towards Inclusive Classrooms

Here is another interesting resource (2015) about inclusive classroom practices. This article was linked from The Conversation. The author is Madeline Shellgren, who works at Michigan State University. The title of her article is “Seven Tips Toward Linguistic Inclusion”: http://insideteaching.grad.msu.edu/cultivating-inclusive-classrooms-toward-linguistic-inclusion/

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The Conversation

As an independent source of news and different views, The Conversation delivers articles written by academic and research communities in the UK, Australia and the US. I came across this source in my work with the topic of “linguistic inclusion”. The Conversation takes up a number of different themes. Here is a link to the part about Education: https://theconversation.com/uk/education.

 

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Students’ most significant learning experience 2017-2018

At the end of April, seven teachers of English who have been engaged in further education and continuing professional development (our KFK course) in English at Oslo Metropolitan University will share what they feel is their most significant learning experience this study year. I’m looking forward to reading about those aspects of the course that they highlight as the most effective part(s) from their points of view.

So, this is where you can share your reflections, starting with your individual comment to this post. Later, you are welcome to respond to your fellow students’ blog posts as well. This will be really interesting reading for me and my colleagues.

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My most significant learning experience 2015-2016

In May, this will be the site where 26 teachers engaged in further education or continuing professional development in English in Norway will share their most significant learning experience in the study year that has passed. It is always exciting to see what aspects of the course they highlight as the most effective part.

So, here is where you can share your reflections, starting with your comment to this post. Later, you are welcome to comment on your fellow students’ blog posts as well. I’m looking forward to reading your comments!

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KFK English 2: new year – new students – new vocabulary activities

In September this year a new group of students started their work with English 2, our blended further-education English course for teachers in Norwegian classrooms (Years 5-10). Just like in previous years, these students have to make their own blogs with an entry about how they have worked with vocabulary development in their own classroom.

Two years ago, Scott Thornbury made an entry on his A-Z ELT blog about vocabulary teaching, using material from our in-service teachers’ blog reports as illustrations.

You can read about how this year’s students have worked with vocabulary here:
Year 10: Vibeke | Pål | Brit | Ingrid |Linda |
Year 9:   Ulrika | Marita | Trude |
Year 8:  Karl Andreas | Hanne |
Year 7:   Aud | Erik | Marie |
Year 6:  Elise |Venke |
Year 5:  Bettina | Katrine |

MarteNorunn | Sigmund  | Merete | Elisabeth | Therese | Natalia | Torill

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RE: Postmethods pedagogy

We have discussed “postmethods pedagogy” in our English 2 course this spring. It seems to me that there is some writing and talking across purposes going on in the media at the moment. I find it difficult to imagine sensible and experienced teachers taking “methodological freedom” to mean teaching any way they like. Still, this article by Thomas Nordahl explains his view on the matter. We may not all share his strong belief that “research-based instruction” has only one unique definition, and one set of obvious implications, but it is useful to get a clear idea about one of the positions: http://www.utdanningsnytt.no/debatt/2015/mai/den-kunnskapsbaserte-lareren/

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